Helheim Hassle Review – Bjørn To Be Good

In 2016 Perfectly Paranomal gave the world Manual Samuel, an adventure game where the goofy hero was given a chance by Death to live again provided he could go 24-hours doing everything manually. 4-years later, Perfectly Paranormal are back with another unique experience in the form of Helheim Hassle, mixing the weird humour of Manual Samuel with an equally weird gameplay idea: what if you could detach all your limbs and control them? And while Helheim Hassle does actually take place at the same time as Manual Samuel, you don’t need to have ever played Perfectly Paranormal’s Prior work to enjoy this wholly barmy adventure. But is Helheim Hassle worth an arm and a leg? Does it even have a leg to stand on? Can it possibly get ahead of all the competition? Or is it just another h(armless) adventure game? Okay, I’ll stop now.

Cyberpunk 2077 Review – The Best Mess Of 2020

Say what you like about the game itself, there’s no denying that the launch of Cyberpunk 2077 has been anything but dull and is probably the most controversial launch in recent memory. Three delays in 2020 suggested that CD Projekt RED were planning on sticking to their mantra that it would only be launched when it was ready, and given the company’s stellar reputation pre-orders were through the roof with over 8-million copies being sold before it was even playable. And then everything fell apart faster my mental wellbeing after trying to speak to an actual living, breathing, human female. Only PC review code was handed, performance on base consoles is unacceptably bad, Sony removed the game from sale on the Playstation store and CD Projekt RED have managed to dig themselves into a hole so large that future archaeologists are going to assume there was a massive asteroid impact. Either they knew about the game’s horrendous amount of bugs and poor performance and chose to very deliberately keep that information quiet, or they honestly didn’t know how bad things were, in which case they are wholly incompetent. Either way, it doesn’t paint CD Projekt RED in a good light. So, now that we’re a little removed from the initial chaos, let’s review Cyberpunk 2077 on the Playstation 5 and try to figure out whether the game under the mess is any good.

Weekend Whammy: Skate & Murder & Glitches

Hello, hello, and hello my fine fellow humans! I hope you all had a kickass Christmas and a most excellent New Year. It was quiet here for both events. I picked up one of my brothers for Christmas day, and had both nieces up on Christmas Eve so they could open their presents. And then New Year was nothing special because lockdown was in full effect, so there was nowhere to go. It felt strange not spending New Year in the company of my best mate, matching stupid videos, playing Trials and making lame jokes. I made lame jokes and played Trials on my own, but it just wasn’t the same.

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 Review – Sick

Let’s assume for a moment that you’ve been living in some sort of perpetual darkness your entire life with no access to the Internet, game consoles or even a toilet. Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 is a skateboarding game that’s all about arcadey thrills and spills as you link together tricks into increasingly absurd combos. For millions of people, myself firmly included, the Tony Hawk series was a childhood staple that helped drive interest in skateboarding and introduced kids to some of the greatest music to ever grace a video game. To this day Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2 is one of the highest rated games ever, a classic among classics. Sadly the Tony Hawk game empire crumbled eventually, with Robomodo taking over from Neversoft and doing a bloody awful job it, culminating in the crappy Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 5 and a naff attempt to remaster the first game. But now Vicarious Visions are taking a stab at bringing both of the first two Hawk games back to life in this remake, and I’m happy to report Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 1+2 is both a nostalgia filled trip down memory lane and a bloody awesome game for anybody looking to jump into Pro Skater for the first time.

The Best Game Of 2020 That You Shouldn’t Buy (Yet)

What other game than Cyberpunk 2077 could possibly have won this illustrous award that hundreds of developers clamor over to claim? Well, truthfully, Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla almost took the crown due to being a buggy mess and the fact that I still can’t actually finish the game to this day. But then Cyberpunk 2077 stomped in, struck a T-pose, gliding across the floor and stole the crown right out from under Eivor’s hooded gaze.

The Best Overlooked Video Game Gem Of 2020 Was….

Launched back in March, Ori & the Will of the Wisps received a lot of glowing reviews but was damaged by performance issues. But since I only got around to finally playing it last week those issues have been resolved and new, shiny Xbox Series X and Series enhancements came out. In other words, I played Ori & the Will of the Wisps in its best form, blissfully unaware of any launch woes it might have suffered from. And I’m so glad I stumbled upon it this way, because it’s a glorious, playful, vibrant, wonderful game and feels like it has been vastly overlooked and underappreciated, despite it being on Games Pass.

The Best Playstation Game of 2020 Was…

Spider-Man: Miles Morales was a strong contender for the best Playstation game of 2020, delivering another slice of outstanding web-slinging combined with a fun story. But Miles Morales was a known quantity – after the success of Marvel’s Spider-Man in 2018, it seemed a safe bet that a follow-up would be terrific. But Ghost of Tsushima was an unknown element. Yes, Sucker Punch have a rich and successful history, but Ghost of Tsushima was a brand-new IP that didn’t actually have much hype and marketing prior to hitting store shelves, and wound up launching right next to the biggest Playstation title of the year, The Last of Us Part 2. That’s a daunting thought for any developer. And yet Sucker Punch didn’t need to be worried because of Ghost of Tsushima ended up being the perfect antidote to The Last of Us 2’s relentless assault of dark themes and violence. The Last of Us Part 2 is beautiful from a technical perspective, but Ghost of Tsushima is beautiful in the truest sense. I constantly abused the photo-mode, taking dozens and dozens of pictures of Tsushima’s awe-inspiring landscapes.

The Best Xbox Game of 2020 Was…

In terms of games Microsoft hasn’t exactly had a great year. While Sony pushed out multiple exclusive games that have garnered incredible critic scores and huge sales numbers, Microsoft have had very little to get excited about. Of course, their planned acquisition of Zenimax could change all of that in the future, but for now Microsoft haven’t had much to offer their players. It’s also a little tricky to pick a game for this category because so many of Microsoft’s games aren’t actually exclusive to their console, typically appearing on PC as well. In fact, the game that I would have selected actually popped up on Nintendo Switch, too, disqualifying it. Don’t worry, though, that game will be appearing later on. So, for this award, I’m including Xbox games that are available on PC, too.

The Best Game Of 2020 That Made Me Feel Stupid

Admittedly, at my advanced age of 29, it doesn’t take much to make me feel like an idiot these days. These young ‘uns and their complex games full of buttons and icons are so damn hard to keep up with. But one game released in 2020 in particuilar made my brain hurt, made me agonize over every little chance, made me question my every move. And it was a game that was a surprise, a sequel that arrived years and years after the last entry. Yes, Desperados 3 takes hom the highly coveted, hugely sought after award for The Best Game of 2020 That Made Me Feel Stupid.