Tag: strategy

Before We Leave Review – Chilled City-Building Goodness

Before We Leave is built on the basic principles of the classic 4x genre, except it’s actually more of a 3x game. It eschews combat an violence entirely, focusing solely on the other three Xs: explore, expand and exploit. It describes itself as a “non-violent city-building game set in your own cosy corner of the universe.” But can we really enjoy a strategy game without the ever-present threat of war and annihilation? Can we truly be content living peacefully? I mean, how will I be entertained without chainsawing someone in half?

Alder’s Blood Review – God Is Dead

Alder’s Blood certainly has an awesome setup: mankind has killed God, and now His corpse is corrupting the world, unleashing unrelenting horrors in the form of savage beasts. As the game opens you control Duke, a Hunter seeking the body of God in order to hopefully end the torment. But Duke’s reward is instead a haunting vision of horror that leaves him blind. You then swap over to Chief and his band of Hunter’s as they find Duke and set off on a mission to find the body of God, deal with the monsters and hopefully survive this bleak world through turn-based stealth and monster slaying.

Shock Tactics Review – The Wrong Kind Of Shock

When Firaxis brought back the venerable XCOM series from the dead nobody could have predicted how damn good it would be, its turned-based tactical mayhem creating a palpable sense of tension. It was difficult, too, demanding that you contemplate every move or else lose your soldiers forever. XCOM 2 had a rough launch, but it still managed to improve on Enemy Unknown, refining various parts of the core gameplay. Unsurprisingly several companies have attempted to leap onto the bandwagon. Shock Tactics happens to be the latest game trying to capture the magic of yelling at virtual soldiers because they missed a 90% chance to hit. It’s also not that good.

Urban Empire Review – Council Votes No

From the screenshots Urban Empire presents itself as a city builder in the vein of Cities Skylines, but in reality it’s more a political game infused with the story of your chosen family through their decades of rule. The actual city construction and management is quite light compared to other games, and thus a lot of Urban Empire is waiting around for your city to grow. Arguably it’s too simple, its lack of precise control and more in-depth options making it feel as though you’re merely poking the city from time to time with a large stick from a great distance while arguing with a bunch of people about poking it again.

Stellaris Review – To Boldly Click Where No Man Has Clicked Before

Right now the human race is pondering ways of achieving ways to leave our solar system and colonize other planets. Theories on how to terraform Mars or to set up a base on the moon are thrown around constantly. Despite the fact that we’ve yet to sort out our own planet, we already want to travel through space and seek out new planets and life. Stellaris, the new strategy game from genre veteran Paradox, lets you take control of humans or an alien race who embarking on their first forays into the universe, guiding them through the process of setting up a galactic empire, building a military, colonizing new planets, researching powerful technology, handling diplomacy and declaring way. It’s big and flawed and sometimes ugly, but at its core Stellaris is a compelling experience.