Tag: steam

Mad Games Tycoon Review – I Made A Game About Making Games In A Game.

Dominating the videogame industry is surprisingly easy. Had I know, this I would surely have entered into the field at a young age and been a mult-billionaire by this point, swimming in cash acquired from willing suckers in lucrative free-to-play games. About a dozen hours into my time with Mad Games Tycoon I’ve acquired the largest building possible, which houses two development teams, each supported by their very own PR departments, mo-cap studios, roomful of testers to tweak the balance and check for bugs, sizable areas dedicated purely to graphics and bunches of sound engineers. On top of that I have in-house production that also lets me publish games from other developers as well as my own, a server room to support my numerous MMOs and training areas so that my staff can be the best possible. Also, there’s some kickin’ sound systems strewn about the place. Yup, domination is good.

Seraph Review – Aiming Is For Losers

The side-scrolling shooter has long been a staple of videogames across many different incarnations. But one thing is typically included; aiming whatever weapon the main character wields. Seraph, though, seeks to get rid of this minor inconvenience, removing the ability to aim. Just fire the weapons and your virtual avatar will do all the rest, gunning down demon hordes. What madness is this?

Cossacks 3 Review – Less Sequel, More HD Remaster

Cossacks 3 is guilty of false advertising, really. You see, despite its name it’s not really a sequel to the much-loved Cossacks series, rather it’s pretty much a complete remake of the original game, retaining most of its balance and mechanics while upgrading the graphics and smoothing out the gameplay a touch. It’s a pleasant leap back to a simpler time of RTS games where factions didn’t vary very much in their design and the level of variety wasn’t that high. I know that doesn’t sound very appealing, but trust me, it actually is.

N++ Review – Prepare To Die. A Lot.

Videogames often attempt to sweep us up in complex, deep narratives that provide context for our actions. N++, though, has just one small page of story, and even it is relegated to a separate screen. Yup, you actually have to go and look for the narrative. You’re a ninja who loves to collect gold strewn around the many death traps you’re attempting to escape. To get out you find the switch that opens the door and then head for the exit, grabbing as much gold as you can along the way in order to net those high scores. But the context doesn’t matter. No, what does matter is that N++ is sublime in its stark simplicity, a direct contrast to the visually stunning, mechanically complex videogames of the modern era.

The Turing Test Review – Impulse. Response. Fluid. Imperfect. Patterned. Chaotic.

One constant within sci-fi is the creepy A.I. whom you are never sure is entirely trustworthy or has perhaps become truly sentenient. It’s a topic that has been debated time and time again; could an A.I. ever truly be human? What does it even mean to be a human? Will Skynet happen? If so is Arnold Schwarnagger going to reveal he actually is a Terminator? All important questions. The Turing Test, though, is less interested in Terminator and much more intrigued by questions of humanity, free will and what constitutes true thought. Heavy stuff, indeed.

F1 2016 Review – Podium Finish

Having skipped the last entry in the series, which proved to be somewhat controversial due to its list of stripped features, I’ve come back to Codemasters F1 series with a sense caution. Turns out I needn’t have worried, though, because in my eyes this is the best the series has been so far, delivering superb handling and a polished experience that suggests Codemasters learned their lessons from last year. Furthermore, they geeked out, tossing in safety cars, formation laps and manual launches off the starting line. Talk about compensating, eh?

Tom Vs The Armies Of Hell Review – Working 9-5 Really Is Hell

Tom leads a pretty normal life, working a nine to five coding job that typically lasts a lot longer than it should, and hating every minute of it. He’s stuffed into a little cubicle, alloted a 2-minute break each day and deals with people whom he barely cares about. It’s a familiar picture for so many people around the world who must trudge to a job they hate every day. Sadly for Tom hell on Earth literally becomes actual Hell as his entire building gets dragged into the fire-filled dimension from down under, all thanks to his company’s secret underground shenanigans with dimension-hopping technology. Things get somehow worse for Tom as a resident of Hell decides to use his entrails as a skipping rope, ripping off his arm in the process. Tom, though, doesn’t just get to die, which in many ways might be a preferable option, but rather his life is saved by a strange imp named Beezle who replaces his severed arm with a demonic one obtained from…eh, somewhere. That’s not all, though, because Beezle also holds Tom’s soul, meaning Tom has to go along with Beezle’s plans.

DOOM Review – So. Much. Gore.

I need to amend my article from a short while ago detail my seven favorite games of 2016 so far, because DOOM needs to be right near the top with the Witcher 3’s Blood & Wine DLC. This is a return to a simpler time of lighting fast movement and balls-to-the-wall shooting that leaves you a little bit breathless and a whole lot happy. It’s exciting, visceral and a whole bunch of other PR friendly words that you’d probably find adorning a press release. DOOM kills it throughout the entirety of its campaign. It’s only misteps are its forays into the realms of competitive multiplayer.